Ben Lynch ND

Dr. Ben Lynch is a naturopathic physician (ND), and he received his BS degree in Cell and Molecular biology from the University of Washington. He earned his ND from Bastyr University. He found his interest in and passion for discovering and identifying the root or cause of disease directed his study and work to feature on nutrigenomics and methylation dysfunction. Dr. Lynch continues to research, write, and on the subject of MTHFR and methylation defects. He educates other medical professionals on the clinical aspects of MTHFR, and you can contact him via his website.  Learn more about Dr. Lynch and his work at www.MTHFR.net.  Dr. Lynch is also the president and CEO of Seeking Health, a company focused on disease prevention and health promotion.

He enjoys researching and discovering ways to resolve complex health problems. When not researching, you’ll find him spending time with his wife, Nadia, and three boys, Tasman, Mathew and Theo. We’re big into soccer, being outside, any type of water activity and traveling. Key travel highlights include working with Mother Teresa in Calcutta, sailing from Australia to Indonesia and working as a jackaroo on a 1.5 million acre cattle station in Outback Australia.

His goal is to empower you to take charge of your genetic health, so that you can reach your full potential. Too many people are struggling with health problems that they just don’t have to endure. When you give your genes what they need, you can function at your best.

You might say he’s an expert in epigenetics—the science of understanding how your genes are expressed and how you can use diet, supplements, environment, and lifestyle to shape your genetic destiny. When you know what your genes need, you can choose a diet and lifestyle that optimize your health. It’s the difference between staggering under the weight of depression, anxiety, ADHD, insomnia, heart disease, obesity, food cravings, fatigue, addictions, and a hundred other disorders—or living a healthy, vital life, free of symptoms and full of energy.

But there’s a problem. Trying to find out more about your genes, including your own specific genetic challenges, isn’t easy. You can easily be swamped by a mass of confusing information and contradictory recommendations that feel nearly impossible to sort through.


I am so grateful to Dr. Lynch for his intense focus and understanding of MTHFR. I learned so much from him that helped me tremendously to make a huge difference in my heatlh. I learned the difference between folate and folic acid and why I need to avoid it. I learned why I had a lifelong issue with a B6 deficiency. I understand why I feel better when I avoid foods and supplements with folic acid.  I’ve researched foods that are high in folate and B6 and supplement with a low dose of a methylated B complex recommended by my metabolic cardiologist. I’ve learned more about SAMe and GABA. Why glutithione is important and which foods contain it. I don’t understand it all but I learned enough to save my life.

Hear the latest podcast interview of Dr. Lynch I found fascinating, especially regarding the liver and gallbladder connection to everything. I’ve been wondering the connection too since 4 out of 5 of my family members (including me) have had our gallbladders removed. All of us were diagnosed with some fancy name for a sluge filled gallbladder.  None of us had gallstones but our bile was to thick to flow through the bile ducts and necessitated surgery.  I’m thinking there is a connection…somehow to MTHFR, heart disease and the malfunctioning liver. I’ve been doing research on which foods support the liver because I feel that the liver is to often ignored, especially with chronic disease and multiple prescriptions that accompany such a diagnosis.

Listen to the podcast (transcript also available on the website)

RHR: What Influences Methylation? An Interview with Dr. Ben Lynch

A must read for understanding MTHFR, Dr. Ben Lynch’s new book, “Dirty Genes